Throwback Thursday #11

A great new Challenge from Wetanddustyroads

I am sure we all have lots of photos and memories

Photos from our first trip to Tulbagh in 2013

Tulbagh, named after Dutch Cape Colony Governor Ryk Tulbagh, is a town located in the “Land van Waveren” mountain basin, in the Winelands of the Western Cape, South Africa. The basin is fringed on three sides by mountains, and is drained by the Klein Berg River and its tributaries.

Tulbagh

In September 1969 the Boland area was hit by an earthquake that caused considerable damage to the town of Tulbagh. Many of the Church Street buildings were destroyed. The extent of the damage was aptly described by the Journal Bulletin of the Simon van der Stel Foundation in 1973: “A street that somehow captured the essential spirit of a unique culture looked as if it was in the throes of a nightmare: many fine gables had either tumbled or were totally destroyed, whole sections of many houses had collapsed, most of the soft brick walls had burst open in wide cracks, plaster had been torn by off in large sheets, rafters and roofs had caved in. Everything appeared to be in total and irreparable ruin.”

After the disaster in Church Street, extensive projects of restoration began with the National Committee for the Restoration of Historic Buildings in Tulbagh and its Environment. Because of this work Tulbagh now contains possibly the largest number of Cape-Dutch, Edwardian and Victorian provincial heritage sites in one street in South Africa, and remains a major tourist attraction of the town to the present day. The work started by the committee has been continued to the present day by various residents of Tulbagh, but also significantly by the Tulbagh Valley Heritage Foundation, which aims to restore and maintain “all structures older than 60 years, the cultural landscape and undeveloped properties connected to the historical structures above”. Wikipedia

Tulbagh in a distance
Beautiful buildings
Buildings in Church Street
Walking down Church Street
A sculpture at the Saronsberg wine farm in the Tulbagh area.
Trees at Saronsberg .

Lens-Artists Photo Challenge #231 Looking back

Sofia is this week’s host for the Lens-Artist challenge

 

Old fashioned phones

A telephone is a telecommunications device that permits two or more users to conduct a conversation when they are too far apart to be easily heard directly. A telephone converts sound, typically and most efficiently the human voice, into electronic signals that are transmitted via cables and other communication channels to another telephone which reproduces the sound to the receiving user. The term is derived from Greek: τῆλε (tēlefar) and φωνή (phōnēvoice), together meaning distant voice. A common short form of the term is phone, which came into use early in the telephone’s history.

In 1876, Alexander Graham Bell was the first to be granted a United States patent for a device that produced clearly intelligible replication of the human voice at a second device. This instrument was further developed by many others, and became rapidly indispensable in business, government, and in households

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The essential elements of a telephone are a microphone (transmitter) to speak into and an earphone (receiver) which reproduces the voice at a distant location.The receiver and transmitter are usually built into a handset which is held up to the ear and mouth during conversation. The transmitter converts the sound waves to electrical signals which are sent through the telecommunication system to the receiving telephone, which converts the signals into audible sound in the receiver or sometimes a loudspeaker. Telephones permit transmission in both directions simultaneously.

Most telephones also contain an alerting feature, such as a ringer or a visual indicator, to announce an incoming telephone call. Telephone calls are initiated most commonly with a keypad or dial, affixed to the telephone, to enter a telephone number, which is the address of the call recipient’s telephone in the telecommunication system, but other methods existed in the early history of the telephone.

The first telephones were directly connected to each other from one customer’s office or residence to another customer’s location. Being impractical beyond just a few customers, these systems were quickly replaced by manually operated centrally located switchboards. These exchanges were soon connected together, eventually forming an automated, worldwide public switched telephone network. For greater mobility, various radio systems were developed for transmission between mobile stations on ships and automobiles in the mid-20th century. Hand-held mobile phones were introduced for personal service starting in 1973. In later decades, their analog cellular system evolved into digital networks with greater capability and lower cost.

Convergence in communication services has provided a broad spectrum of capabilities in cell phones, including mobile computing, giving rise to the smartphone, the dominant type of telephone in the world today. Wikipedia

Mobile phone

 

 

 

 

Throwback Thursday #9

Namibia

A great new Challenge from Wetanddustyroads

Please join us in the fun! I am sure we all have lots of photos and memories to share.

Namibia 2018

Nests of social weavers (Philetairus socius), Namibia

The sociable weaver is a species of bird in the Passeridae family endemic to Southern Africa. It is found in South Africa, Namibia, and Botswana. They build large compound community nests, a rarity among birds. These nests are perhaps the most spectacular structure built by any bird

Communial nests
tree
Weaver’s communal nests
Communial waever’s nests in Grunau, Namibia
trees
Quiver tree -Communual nests

 

Communual Nests

 

Communual nests – Close-up
Communual nests