Color your World: Red Violet

In 1930 they also began a concept called the “Crayola Color Wheel” that offered up Crayola colors based on the color wheel concept of distinguishing colors developed by Munsell and then adapted for Crayola’s use.  The No. 16 assortment was offered in two versions.  You could get the regular assortment with Black, Brown, Bt. Sienna, Cobalt Blue, Eng. Vermilion, Gold Ochre, Light Yellow, Lt. Green, Madder Lake, Medium Green, Olive Green, Orange, Prussian Blue, Rose Pink, Violet, White or you could get the color wheel assortment offering BLACK, BLUE, BLUE GREEN, BLUE VIOLET, BROWN, GREEN, NEUTRAL GRAY, ORANGE, RED, RED ORANGE, RED VIOLET, VIOLET, WHITE, YELLOW, YELLOW GREEN, YELLOW ORANGE.  These new colors were offered up in their new wrapper type that appeared in assortments around 1928.IMG_3541

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Half-Light

it is about the time
when gold meets
the earth

the light emitted
romantically sings
the land to slumbertriumph2it is about the time
when thoughts drift
and eyes wander

they follow
painted brush strokes
made by pulling windsIMG_6288

it is about the time
you call
it is distant and faint

a sweet sound
carried to my ear
as it is meant to be

it is about the time
I turn to you in half light
As twilight fills your faceFXCD0170It is beautiful
soft and warm
in the waning sun

Color your World: Red orange

Crayola made many changes to their different crayon lines in the early 1930s including several design changes to their Gold Medal line. None of these changes affected the core colors or names even though they had gone through several wrapper designs for the crayons as well.  Crayola did their corporate duty during the depression by having farm folks do all of their crayon wrapper labeling for them; a service that helped folks out during a tough time.

In 1930 they also began a concept called the “Crayola Color Wheel” that offered up Crayola colors based on the color wheel concept of distinguishing colors developed by Munsell and then adapted for Crayola’s use.  The No. 16 assortment was offered in two versions.  You could get the regular assortment with Black, Brown, Bt. Sienna, Cobalt Blue, Eng. Vermilion, Gold Ochre, Light Yellow, Lt. Green, Madder Lake, Medium Green, Olive Green, Orange, Prussian Blue, Rose Pink, Violet, White or you could get the color wheel assortment offering BLACK, BLUE, BLUE GREEN, BLUE VIOLET, BROWN, GREEN, NEUTRAL GRAY, ORANGE, RED, RED ORANGE, RED VIOLET, VIOLET, WHITE, YELLOW, YELLOW GREEN, YELLOW ORANGE.  These new colors were offered up in their new wrapper type that appeared in assortments around 1928.
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Floral Friday : Osteospermum fruticosum

Osteospermum fruticosum , also called the trailing African daisy or shrubby daisy bush, is a shrubby, semi-succulent herbaceous flowering plant native to South Africa, belonging to the small tribe Calenduleae of the sunflower family (Asteraceae).

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It grows between 6 and 12 inches tall and can spread four to six feet in width. The dark-centered daisy-like flowers range in color from deep purple to white. Some hybrid growers have bred pale yellow-flowering strains. The plant is a perennial in mild climates.

FLORAL FRIDAY FOTOS

Color your World: Red

Red is one of the subtractive primary colors, along with yellow and blue.

Red was widely used in prehistoric cave art, made with red hematite or iron oxide, or red ochre. Early civilizations in China, the Middle East and Europe made red dyes from the madder plant or from a tiny insect called Kermes vermilio. Civilizations in the Americas made brilliant reds from another scale insect, the cochineal; ancient Chinese artists during the Han Dynasty used dye from the madder plant to color silk and pigments from lead oxide to color pottery.

The word red is derived from the Old English rēad

The red colour was part of the original Crayola set of crayons in 1903.IMG_3669badge

Cee’s flower of the day

 

 

Color your World: Razzmatazz and flower of the day

In 1992 Crayola started with their debut of the Big Box; an assortment that was simply wider than the No. 64 but still had the stadium configuration with the flip back lid.  To get to 96 colors, they used the standard 64 colors plus the 16 fluorescent colours . The remaining 16 colors were the ones the consumers got to name.  They started the campaign by first putting the crayons in without color names and advertising the contest right on the box. 

Crayola Big Box (16 New diff upper right) - 96 colors.jpgThe contest ran during 1992 but the winners weren’t announced and shown on the boxes until 1993. 

#13 razzmatazz named by Laura Bartolomei-Hill Age: 5 ½DSC_0307badge

Cee’s flower of the day