Taking a blog break

I will not be available on internet for a while to post or keep up with all the reading…  Hopefully, when  I am back I will  have time to catch-up with you all!

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Leucadendron ‘Jester’

Leucadendron ‘Jester’ (Sunshine Conebush) –

Medium sized shrub 5′ x 5′ with beautiful pink varigated leaves & red flush in fall-winter-spring. Frost and drought tolerant once established. Slow growing initially. Great screen or hedge plant for well drained soils in full sun. Excellent foliage for cut flowers. One look at ‘Jester’ and one can understand why it is so named as it is definitely a clown in the garden sporting colors of bright pink, cream and green. Its other name, ‘Safari Sunshine’ is also nice as a reference to all of these colors and is a nod to it being a sport of ‘Safari Sunset’, though it is less vigorous is smaller.056 One look at ‘Jester’ and one can understand why it is so named as it is definitely a clown in the garden sporting colors of bright pink, cream and green. Its other name, ‘Safari Sunshine’ is also nice as a reference to all of these colors and is a nod to it being a sport of ‘Safari Sunset’, though it is less vigorous is smaller.057

Cut branches are prized for use in arrangements and foliage material. Originally introduced into the trade by Duncan & Davies (New Zealand) in 1986 as ‘Jester’. It was granted protection under Plant Breeders Rights (PBR) in New Zealand and South Africa under this name. In Brian Matthews’ “The Protea Book” he notes that ‘Jester’ and ‘Safari Sunshine’ are essentially the same plant.

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FLORAL FRIDAY FOTOS

Floral Friday : Protea cynaroides

The king protea (Protea cynaroides) is a flowering plant. It is a distinctive member of Protea, having the largest flower head in the genus. The species is also known as giant protea, honeypot or king sugar bush. It is widely distributed in the southwestern and southern parts of South Africa in the fynbos region.017

The king protea is the national flower of South Africa. It also is the flagship of the The Protea Atlas Project, run by the South African National Botanical Institute.018

The king protea has several colour forms and horticulturists have recognized 81 garden varieties, some of which have injudiciously been planted in its natural range. In some varieties the pink of the flower and red borders of leaves are replaced by a creamy yellow. This unusual flower has a long vase life in flower arrangements, and makes for an excellent dried flower.IMG_7352

Protea cynaroides is adapted to survive wildfires by its thick underground stem, which contains many dormant buds; these will produce the new growth after the fire.

P. cynaroides grows in a harsh environment with dry, hot summers and wet, cold winters. Several adaptions include tough, leathery leaves, which helps to prevent excessive loss of moisture.IMG_7351

The flowers are fed at by a range of nectarivorous birds, mainly sunbirds and sugarbirds, including the orange-breasted sunbird (Anthobaphes violacea), southern double-collared sunbird (Cinnyris chalybeus), malachite sunbird (Nectarinia famosa), and the Cape sugarbird (Promerops cafer). In order to reach the nectar, the bird must push its bill into the inflorescence. As it does so, its bill and face gets brushed with pollen, thereby allowing for possible pollination.IMG_7353

 Along with birds, a host of insects are attracted to the flowerhead, such as bees, for example the Cape honeybee, and various beetle species such as rove beetles and the beetles of the huge familyScarabaeidae such as the protea beetle Trichostetha fascicularis and monkey beetles.

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Like many other Protea species, P. cynaroides is adapted to an environment in which bushfires are essential for reproduction and regeneration. Most Protea species can be placed in one of two broad groups according to their response to fire: reseeders are killed by fire, but fire also triggers the release of their canopy seed bank, thus promoting recruitment of the next generation; resprouters survive fire, resprouting from a lignotuber or, more rarely, epicormic buds protected by thick bark. P. cynaroides is a resprouter as it shoots up new stems from buds in its thick underground stem after a fire. Wikipedia

FLORAL FRIDAY FOTOS