Indigo

India is believed to be the oldest center of indigo dyeing in the Old World. It was a primary supplier of indigo dye, derived from the plant Indigofera tinctoria, to Europe as early as the Greco-Roman era. The association of India with indigo is reflected in the Greek word for the ‘dye’, which was indikon (ινδικόν). The Romans used the term indicum, which passed into Italian dialect and eventually into English as the word indigo. El Salvador has lately been the biggest producer of indigo.

The same indigo dye is contained in the woad plant, Isatis tinctoria, for a long time the main source of blue dye in Europe. Woad was replaced by true indigo as trade routes opened up, and both are now largely replaced by synthetic dyes.IMG_3020

Though the word indigo has existed in English since the 13th century, it may never have been a common part of the basic color-naming system.IMG_3137

 

 

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11 thoughts on “Indigo

  1. well not sure if you have been to JNWs indigo post yet – but the actual purple to blue ratio was something I have been chewing on all week with indigo – and in your post here – this is the classic way I viewed this color – with more blue – and I also loved your little history of it – so I am going to link it with my post – cool?

    Liked by 2 people

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